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Восстановление Honda Flush S

Coolant Flush

This method is a lot easier than using the engine coolant drain bolts, because those bolts are often seized and are hard to get to.

WARNING
Make decisions carefully. If you choose to use this method and ignore the fact that I say to use undiluted antifreeze and you use 50/50 mix, your end result will be a 75/25 mix (75% water, 25% antifreeze). If you decide to just fill completely with 50/50 mix after you flush the engine with water, you will not end up with a 50/50 mix in the engine. Because of the water still in the engine after flushing, you will probably end up with around 65/35 (65% water, 35% antifreeze).

Materials needed:
-1 gallon 100% undiluted antifreeze
-2 gallons distilled water (at least)
-Bucket
-Jack
-Jackstands
-Funnel
-Socket wrench with extension and 12mm socket (keeps your hands away from the scolding hot coolant while bleeding).

Preliminary: Set the e-brake. Jack up the front of the car and put on stands. Get a bucket under the radiator, and slide/turn your heater temperature all the way to hot.

1. Drain the radiator by removing the cap at the top and unscrewing the drain plug at the bottom.

2. Put the drain plug back in and fill radiator with distilled water.

3. Put the radiator cap back on and run the engine for around a minute and then turn it off.

4. Repeat steps 1-3 until the only thing draining out of your radiator is clean water.

5. Drain the radiator for the last time.

6. Put the radiator drain plug back in and lower the car to the ground.

7. Carefully remove the cap (it may shoot everywhere, get a rag). Fill the radiator with half of your coolant systems capacity (see information below for your engine’s numbers) in 100% undiluted antifreeze

8. Fill the radiator all the way up to the bottom of the filler neck with water (you now have a 50/50 mixed solution in your system)

9. Add 50/50 mix of water/antifreeze to the coolant reservoir.

10. Leaving the radiator cap off, start the engine and let it warm up to normal (radiator fan comes on twice).

11. Bleed the system of air from the bleed bolt on the front left corner of the head. Let it flow until a steady stream comes out. Tighten bleed bolt to specs. (If you don’t have a torque wrench just get the bolt tightened snug. It just needs to stay screwed in by itself. Be very careful tightening). If you can’t find the bleed bolt, your bleed bolt may be at the thermostat housing if it isn’t at the front of the engine. 96-00 Civics and 96-97 del Sols don’t have a bleed bolt and you simply idle the engine with the radiator cap off and let the air bubbles escape.

12. Turn off the engine.

13. Fill the radiator back up to the bottom of the filler neck with 50/50 mix of water/antifreeze, and fill the reservoir to the max mark with 50/50 mix of water/antifreeze. Install radiator cap.

Half of coolant capacity:
This is the amount of 100% undiluted antifreeze you will add in step 7. This is half the capacity, I have already done the math for you.
Please note that if your Civic is made in Canada, or any other country, the model numbers next to the amount are incorrect for you.
(For 1996-2000 Civics, Canadian Si=USDM EX, Canadian SiR=USDM Si. I’m not sure about the rest.)
The engines and capacities are still correct though, if your car has that engine.

(MT=Manual Transmission, AT=Automatic Transmission)

84-87 Honda Civic/CRX
All: 0.68 Gallons

88-91 Honda Civic/CRX
All SOHC: 0.59 Gallons
All DOHC: 0.60 Gallons

92-95 Honda Civic/93-95 Honda del Sol
D15B8 MT: 0.56 Gallons (Civic CX)
D15Z1 MT: 0.54 Gallons (Civic VX)
D15B7 MT: 0.56 Gallons (Civic DX/LX, del Sol S)
D15B7 AT: 0.54 Gallons (Civic DX/LX, del Sol S)
D16Z6 MT: 0.56 Gallons (Civic EX/Si, del Sol Si)
D16Z6 AT: 0.58 Gallons (Civic EX, del Sol Si)
B16A3 MT: 0.66 Gallons (del Sol VTEC)

96-00 Honda Civic/96-97 Honda del Sol
D16Y5 MT: 0.55 Gallons (Civic HX)
D16Y5 AT: 0.56 Gallons (Civic HX)
D16Y7 MT: 0.55 Gallons (Civic CX/DX/LX, del Sol S)
D16Y7 AT: 0.54 Gallons (Civic CX/DX/LX, del Sol S)
D16Y8 MT: 0.55 Gallons (Civic EX, del Sol Si)
D16Y8 AT: 0.56 Gallons (Civic EX, del Sol Si)
B16A2 MT: 0.66 Gallons (Civic Si)
B16A3 MT: 0.66 Gallons (del Sol VTEC)

01-05 Honda Civic
D17A1 MT: 0.66 Gallons (Civic DX/LX/VP)
D17A1 AT: 0.65 Gallons (Civic DX/LX/VP)
D17A2 MT: 0.66 Gallons (Civic EX)
D17A2 AT: 0.65 Gallons (Civic EX)
D17A6 MT: 0.65 Gallons (Civic HX)
D17A6 AT: 0.64 Gallons (Civic HX)
K20A3 MT: 0.90 Gallons (Civic Si)

94-01 Acura Integra
B18B1 MT: 0.73 Gallons (Integra RS/LS/GS/SE)
B18B1 AT: 0.89 Gallons (Integra RS/LS/GS/SE)
B18C1 MT: 0.89 Gallons (Integra GS-R)

(If your engine is not in this list, just search the web for the dry coolant capacity and then divide that amount by two. Or look in the Honda Service manual for «for overhaul» capacity. Pay attention to units of measurement.)

Recommended simultaneous maintenance:
-New thermostat if it hasn’t been replaced recently
-Inspect radiator hoses

Pictures were borrowed from the 92-95 Civic Honda Service Manual. These pictures should be applicable to all 88-00 Civics and del Sols.

Honda Auto Trans Flush Procedure — Official

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niteflite

Registered

A question for 2008 crv. It had ATF drained and refilled at around 30k miles — i believe it was just a single drain and refill at an independent mechanic. I’m at close to 60k now. The dealer said i need another fluid change. Can i just do another single drain and refill or do i need to repeat the process x times?

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Buffalo4

Registered

bvogel7475

Registered

rocky

Administrator

ArcticDriver

Registered

I appreciate you clarifying what the dealer (and the Owners Manual?) consider an ATF Service.

I would never allow my own ATF to get so many miles on it.

Its my understanding that the CRV A/T is not a strong transmission to start with so I would consider frequent flush intervals to be cheap insurance. I notice ATF deterioration after 15K miles.

2004 CRV LX 4-speed A/T

Hope to add a 2006 with M/T in the future 😉

Buffalo4

Registered

I appreciate you clarifying what the dealer (and the Owners Manual?) consider an ATF Service.

I would never allow my own ATF to get so many miles on it.

Its my understanding that the CRV A/T is not a strong transmission to start with so I would consider frequent flush intervals to be cheap insurance. I notice ATF deterioration after 15K miles.

ArcticDriver

Registered

Harsher shifting—YES, this is the main problem which resolves with flush.

Slipping—Not experiencing slipping.

Smell—no burnt smell detected.

Just performed two drain & fills and then drove 2K miles on Interstate and 500 miles in city and trans operating fine with no harsh shifting.

2004 CRV LX 4-speed A/T

Hope to add a 2006 with M/T in the future 😉

Buffalo4

Registered

niteflite

Registered

Well, it took me a while to get the drain plug out using a breaker bar. The color was like a prune juice color..dark but not completely black.

I put in 3 quarts. Checked the level using the dip stick but I can’t tell. is the stick supposed to be curved towards the bottom? I don’t mean all the way down but maybe 75% of the way down. Anyhow, I put the old fluid into a pan then into the empty quart bottles. Then I still had enough old fluid to fill a 16 oz water bottle. So I put in another 16 oz new fluid. The dip stick isn’t so easy to read. It hits the sides of the opening the way down and the way up I think due to the curve. The curve at the tip end also makes it hard to tell where the fluid level is at.

I was wondering if the curve not at the tip is supposed to be there..and if I should flatten it.

Is it better to be short a little
atf than too much?

purple

Registered

You are on the right track. A 1x drain and fill at 15k (preferred) or a 2x drain and fill at 30k seems to keep the fluid from oxidizing too much.

Auto transmission fluid changing is the most neglected maintenace item and the single biggest cause of mechanical failure.

I was at the dealer a couple days ago with an oil change on my 2004 EX AWD with AT (177k miles). I asked about a transmission flush & fill and he said not to on higher mileage cars, that the flush & fill will very likely damage the torque converter. I thanked him and left with no service done on the transmission.

Yet I am reading in this thread that frequent trans oil changes are actually good for the transmission.

Can someone explain the difference of opinion between the dealer and forum wisdom?

osbornk

Registered

I was at the dealer a couple days ago with an oil change on my 2004 EX AWD with AT (177k miles). I asked about a transmission flush & fill and he said not to on higher mileage cars, that the flush & fill will very likely damage the torque converter. I thanked him and left with no service done on the transmission.

Yet I am reading in this thread that frequent trans oil changes are actually good for the transmission.

Can someone explain the difference of opinion between the dealer and forum wisdom?

Recoil Rob

Registered

purple

Registered

purple

Registered

Dropping this post from Bob is the Oil Guy forum.

Spoiler: BITOG forum wisdom says it is generally OK to change old fluid on a high mileage car that never had its trans fluid changed. The key is to change the filter at the same time, and follow up the initial dump & fill with another filter/fluid change after a few miles are put on the car. Do your own research and make up your own minds.

Recoil Rob

Registered

purple

Registered

More important info about our transmissions.

The first/second gen (maybe later years too) Auto Trans actually have TWO filters. Many dealers deny existence of either. The super easy to access filter is located near the bottom of the radiator — these can be swapped out for a Magnefine or similar 3/8″ inline filter.

The bad news, especially for AT’s with high mileage and extremely long (or no) fluid changes, is there is a second filter INSIDE the transmission casing. You can see this filter labelled as part #5 on this fiche: http://www.hondapartsnow.com/genuine/honda

As you can see this filter is located deep inside the transmission. There is no getting to it without dropping the entire transmission then partially disassembling it.

The trick with high mileage, low/no fluid service transmissions is to drain & fill AND replace the filterS. Fresh ATF contains cleaning agents that dissipate over time (old nasty ATF is not a good cleaner anymore). Introducing fresh ATF to a box having infrequent or no prior fluid changes could result in particulates being loosened from the cleaning agents in the new ATF. These particulates (such as clutch dust) could accumulate in an unchanged filter to the point of blocking fluid flow and causing catastrophic damage.

In Honda’s brilliance, they made swapping both filters impossible as part of regular maintenance.

A pox on Honda for this. A pox on Honda service departments who don’t press for regular AT drain & fills along with oil changes — ESPECIALLY on CRV’s with non-serviceable internal filters.

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gerlt

Registered

downloader

Registered

More important info about our transmissions.

The first/second gen (maybe later years too) Auto Trans actually have TWO filters. Many dealers deny existence of either. The super easy to access filter is located near the bottom of the radiator — these can be swapped out for a Magnefine or similar 3/8″ inline filter.

The bad news, especially for AT’s with high mileage and extremely long (or no) fluid changes, is there is a second filter INSIDE the transmission casing. You can see this filter labelled as part #5 on this fiche: http://www.hondapartsnow.com/genuine/honda

As you can see this filter is located deep inside the transmission. There is no getting to it without dropping the entire transmission then partially disassembling it.

The trick with high mileage, low/no fluid service transmissions is to drain & fill AND replace the filterS. Fresh ATF contains cleaning agents that dissipate over time (old nasty ATF is not a good cleaner anymore). Introducing fresh ATF to a box having infrequent or no prior fluid changes could result in particulates being loosened from the cleaning agents in the new ATF. These particulates (such as clutch dust) could accumulate in an unchanged filter to the point of blocking fluid flow and causing catastrophic damage.

In Honda’s brilliance, they made swapping both filters impossible as part of regular maintenance.

A pox on Honda for this. A pox on Honda service departments who don’t press for regular AT drain & fills along with oil changes — ESPECIALLY on CRV’s with non-serviceable internal filters.

Price estimate for Transmission flush

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dlaxman31

Registered

I have about 55k on my 2006 Honda Accord v6 and need to get the transmission flushed (first ever I believe). I’m curious how much a transmission flush should cost. Also what should I ask for/look for when getting it done.

I don’t have the time/feel comfortable doing it myself.

Thanks for your input.

LarrynKy

Registered

2006accord4

2006 I4 MT

yeah don’t be a wuss and do it yourself

This is all you need.

LeaDxPainT

Registered

Honda Flush = Drain and Refill x3

If you do find the time, it’s as simple as an oil change. Maybe simpler, you don’t have to deal with a filter.

BLCKFLSH

BRWNFLSH now

strate l o s s

Registered

2012 Accord Sedan EX- Crystal Black Pearl I4

why does everyone have huge mod list in sig ? make build thread->link it

NightMarcher01

aka ‘The Gif King’

A transmission drain and refill is NOT easier than changing your oil! You guys need to stop lying to yourselves! Lol

OP. If you’re gonna do it the correct way, it’ll cost you a little over $100. But if you let the dealer do it the correct way, it’ll cost you more like $500! LMAO

2003 Honda Accord Sedan

LeaDxPainT

Registered

A transmission drain and refill is NOT easier than changing your oil! You guys need to stop lying to yourselves! Lol

OP. If you’re gonna do it the correct way, it’ll cost you a little over $100. But if you let the dealer do it the correct way, it’ll cost you more like $500! LMAO

Oil Change:
1) Loosen oil cap
2) Remove drain plug and wait for oil to drain
3) Remove oil filter
4) Reinstall drain plug with new washer
5) Reinstall oil filter
6) Refill with x quarts of oil

Auto Transmission Change:
1) Loosen Dipstick
2) Same as above
3) Optional, Honda does not instruct to have this done every flush or at all even.
4) Same as above
5) Optional
6) Same as above but with ATF

I have a manual transmission and changing the mtf takes much longer because the fill plug is not an easy one to reach. I follow the same drain fill procedure with my wife’s Civic except I can refill the atf through the dipstick hole. It takes the same amount of time to do an ATF drain and refill as it does an oil «drain and refill».

ATF drain and refill can be spaced out to every 10k miles or «flush» every 30k. Local dealership quoted me about $100 for a transmission drain and refill for the Civic. I know it’s not a same car, but it gives you an idea. The quote was given a few years back.

NightMarcher01

aka ‘The Gif King’

Oil Change:
1) Loosen oil cap
2) Remove drain plug and wait for oil to drain
3) Remove oil filter
4) Reinstall drain plug with new washer
5) Reinstall oil filter
6) Refill with x quarts of oil

Auto Transmission Change:
1) Loosen Dipstick
2) Same as above
3) Optional, Honda does not instruct to have this done every flush or at all even.
4) Same as above
5) Optional
6) Same as above but with ATF

I have a manual transmission and changing the mtf takes much longer because the fill plug is not an easy one to reach. I follow the same drain fill procedure with my wife’s Civic except I can refill the atf through the dipstick hole. It takes the same amount of time to do an ATF drain and refill as it does an oil «drain and refill».

ATF drain and refill can be spaced out to every 10k miles or «flush» every 30k. Local dealership quoted me about $100 for a transmission drain and refill for the Civic. I know it’s not a same car, but it gives you an idea. The quote was given a few years back.

But as I stated, the correct way. OP asked for a transmission FLUSH, a flush consist of changing out the WHOLE transmission fluid, not just 3 quarts.

While an oil change is simply drain and refill. A transmission fluid change consist of the same thing, BUT also taking the car out for a drive and going through each gear, then going back and doing ANOTHER drain and refill, then again! Go out for a drive and go through all the gears, then go back. AGAIN! And do another drain and refill.

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Yeah I think you get the point.

2003 Honda Accord Sedan

LeaDxPainT

Registered

A transmission drain and refill is NOT easier than changing your oil! You guys need to stop lying to yourselves! Lol

OP. If you’re gonna do it the correct way, it’ll cost you a little over $100. But if you let the dealer do it the correct way, it’ll cost you more like $500! LMAO

The post was in response to your quoted text above, of course it’s going to take longer to do a flush. As was mentioned above, Flush=Drain and Refill x3.

Sorry OP, I’ll stop derailing your thread. Just don’t want people to get the wrong idea about DIY maintenance.

strate l o s s

Registered

Honda only recommends doing a drain and fill, a complete flush is only recommended on rare occasions.

I seen the Honda newsletter.

2012 Accord Sedan EX- Crystal Black Pearl I4

why does everyone have huge mod list in sig ? make build thread->link it

thegrouch

Registered

strate l o s s

Registered

a flush machine Honda advises to NEVER use that. I just drain and fill my cars.

2012 Accord Sedan EX- Crystal Black Pearl I4

why does everyone have huge mod list in sig ? make build thread->link it

python6mt

Registered

75k (really hoping they did it at certification at

50k). I’m borderline paranoid because of all the problems with the early 7gens, and the 7.5gens typically haven’t gotten to the 130k-ish miles where the log thread is littered with failures.

With that said, let’s recap:
A 1x drain/fill takes 3qt ATF and is definitely easier than an oil change. The fill bolt is only slightly tough to get to because it’s so far down; a long extension solves this problem immediately (also why you need the long funnel). If you’re paranoid, do this with every oil change. If you’re moderately concerned, every 15k. Most dealerships will charge $100 for this, though it costs all of $24 in fluid (retail prices, you can definitely get the stuff for $6/qt).

A tranny *flush* as others have said, takes 3x drain/fill + another fill, for a total of 12qts. This is because the tranny really has 7qts in it, but only 3 come out on the drain. To mostly replace the fluid, you have to do the exchange 3 times — AND drive it between each time to completely mix the fluid. Alternatively, you can sit it on jack stands and run the car through all the gears each time (much quicker). At 55k, I would highly recommend you do the flush, but I don’t doubt that the dealer would charge you about $500 for the service given that it’s more time consuming than difficult. Total cost in fluids, though: $100 shipped. A good interval for a flush is every 30k (which is why I highly recommend it since you’re nearly double) if you never do any other changes; maybe 45k if you drain/fill at 15k; paranoid people will still flush at 30k despite constant drain fills

As for the ATF filter: it’s probably a good idea to change it at 55k, though you’re probably going to have to do that one yourself, or fight with the dealer to convince them that it exists in the first place, much less agree on a reasonable price to do the change. Word of advice: look up the name of the service manager and always to talk to them when possible. In my experience, the service advisors are typically trained to write you up for retail prices and not much else. Service managers can actually be reasoned with and are much more pleasant.

Cooling System Flush — промывка системы охлаждения (в т.ч. для грузового транспорта)

Cooling System Flush — промывка системы охлаждения (в т.ч. для грузового транспорта)

Характеристики Cooling System Flush — промывка системы охлаждения (в т.ч. для грузового транспорта)

Инструкции

  • Техническое описаниескачать

Wynn’s Cooling System Flush концентрированный продукт для очистки системы охлаждения автомобилей.

Свойства

  • Мощный бескислотный очиститель радиатора.
  • Двойное действие:

1. Очищает от накипи.

2. Уничтожает ржавчину, отложения грязи и остатки масла.

  • Отличная эффективность во всех типах охлаждающей жидкости , в том числе ОАТ антифризах(антифризы основанные на органических карбоновых кислотах).
  • Удерживает грязь во взвешенном состоянии во время очистки.
  • Безопасен для резиновых шлангов, уплотнений и всех металлических частей системы охлаждения.
  • Чрезвычайно эффективно во всех замкнутых системах охлаждения.
  • Восстанавливает оптимальный режим работы управления в системе охлаждения.

Применимость

  • Для “водяных” систем охлаждения всех бензиновых и дизельных двигателей.
  • Рекомендуется использовать при замене ОЖ (следовать рекомендациям изготовителя).
  • Особенно эффективен при очистке старых систем охлаждения.

Характеристики

Внешний вид : зеленая слегка мутная жидкость

Плотность при 15°C: ок. 1,071 кг/дм³

Индекс преломления при 20°C : ок. 1,356

Температура замерзания : ок. 0°C

pH в неразбавленном состоянии : ок. 12,2

Указания по применению

  • Хорошо встряхните банку с продуктом в радиатор или в расширительный бачок, в том случае если на радиаторе нет заливной горловины.
  • Для более высокой производительности, сначала замените старую охлаждающую жидкость водой, а затем добавьте в систему охлаждения Wynn’s Cooling System Flush.
  • Прогрейте двигатель с включенным отопителем салона на максимальном обогреве.
  • Дайте поработать двигателю на холостых оборотах в течение 10 минут. Все это время отопитель салона должен быть включен на максимальном обогреве.
  • Заглушите двигатель, дайте жидкости остынуть. Слейте старую охлаждающую жидкость.
  • Промойте систему водой, до полного вымывания остатков. Закройте сливные отверстия и залейте в систему новую охлаждающую жидкость.
  • Одной банки продукта 325 мл достаточно для обработки системы объемом до 12 литров.
  • Для предотвращения течи охлаждающей жидкости используйте Wynn’s Cooling System Stop Leak.

Фасовка

№ W45944 – 24×325 мл – EN/ES/RU/SV

Примечание

Если на автомобиле установлен фильтр охлаждающей жидкости, то перед ее заменой отключите его.

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